Kyoto Egyptology Colloquium
京都エジプト学コロキウム

Online Egyptological Lecture Series at Kyoto University
京都大学エジプト学オンライン連続講演

First Lecture / 第一回講演

“Gender and the Egyptian Afterlife”
Ginger-Rose Harrington (UNSW Sydney)
「古代エジプトにおけるジェンダーと死後の世界」
ジンジャー=ローズ・ハリントン(ニューサウスウェールズ大学シドニー校)

28th January, Fri. 2022, 18:00-19:30 (Japan) / 20:00-21:30 (Sydney)
2022年1月28日金曜日18時から19時半

The lecture will be given in English online via ZOOM
講演は英語でZOOM上で行われます

Keywords: Afterlife Concepts, Gender Studies, New Kingdom, Egyptian Literature, Egyptian Archaeology
キーワード死後という概念、ジェンダー学、新王国、古代エジプト文学、エジプト考古学

During the New Kingdom, gender was instituted by stylising the sexual lives of men and women. Following an apparently binary division of biological sex in the Egyptian mind, the individual inherited a distinctly gendered suite of ‘enactments’ whereby their male or female body was modelled into a masculine or feminine one.


The present work distinguishes between this passive male/female body and the notion of masculine/feminine embodiment in ancient Egyptian society. It specifically reconstructs the way that male fertility was understood during the New Kingdom and Ptolemaic period, based on its representation in contemporaneous Egyptian literature. In ancient Egyptian culture, male fertility supplied to heterosexual intercourse the principles of movement and life that were constitutive of an offspring.



Following this masculine creative paradigm, command over the powers of male fertility formed a prerequisite to the individual’s rebirth in the afterlife, which systematically disallowed the feminine body’s access to the hereafter. To this end, the present work shows that men and women walked through New Kingdom society in two entirely different ways, which, in turn, affected the way they interacted with the Egyptian mortuary landscape.

Date

Date: January 28 (Friday), 2022

Time: 20:00-21:30 in Sydney, 18:00-19:30 in Kyoto, 10:00-11:30 in Berlin, 9:00-10:30 in London

Place

Zoom: For Ginger's lecture, please register here.

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

Second Lecture / 第回講演

The Development of the Egyptian Political Economy in the Late & Early Ptolemaic Periods: Lessons from the Papyri
Andrew Hogan
(The Center for the Tebtunis Papyri, UC Berkeley)
末期王朝期およびプトレマイオス朝初期におけるエジプトの政治・経済の発展:パピルス文書から分かること
アンドリュー・ホーガン

カリフォルニア大学バークレー校、テブトゥーニス・パピルス文書研究所

24th February, Thu. 2022, 11:00-12:30 AM in Japan - See World Clock - 23rd February Wed. 2022, 6:00-7:30 PM in California
2022年
224曜日11時から12時半(日本時間)

DATE CHANGED!!!

The lecture will be given in English online via ZOOM
講演は英語でZOOM上で行われます

There has been a general understanding that during the First Millennium BC, there was a fundamental reorientation of Egyptian political concerns towards the Mediterranean and Near Eastern spheres as Egypt took part in the growth and consolidation of massive empires in these arenas. Cultural exchange accompanied these interactions, particularly in the latter half of this span when an increased number of Hellenic actors appear in Egyptian records. This period of cultural sharing occurred during a contemporary era of intense development of innovative fiscal strategies in the Near Eastern and Hellenic states. Local and state actors would have been continually sharing this new fiscal expertise with actors in Egypt.

The current offering examines the state of several fiscal institutions in Egypt and assesses the degree to which they were already changing prior to both Persian and Greek incursions in the country and how the historical circumstances mitigated their adoption. While the Ptolemies certainly instituted new iterations of tax farming, cessions of royal monopolies, state banks, coinage, and auction mechanisms to assign many of them, there were institutional precedents for many of these institutions prior to Greek hegemony.

By investigating these developments through the lens of new advances in economic and cultural evolutionary theory and with the application of primary documents from material culture, the Egyptian state can be understood as an actor within a broader Eastern Mediterranean fiscal system during this period. On the one hand, Egypt was slowly changing longstanding institutional practices in the fiscal sphere from the New Kingdom through the Late Period, and, on the other hand, what are so often referred to as Ptolemaic institutions can only be understood through negotiation with the contemporary Egyptian political economy into which they were applied.

Date

Date and Time:

24th February, Thu. 2022, 11:00-12:30 AM in Japan

23rd February Wed. 2022, 6:00-7:30 PM in California

See World Clock

Place

Zoom: For Andrew's lecture, please register here.

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

Links

We are seeking lecturers! Any topics in Egyptology and related fields such as Coptology, Islamic Studies, Biblical Studies, Classics, Archaeology, etc. are welcomed! If you can do a lecture at our colloquium, please contact So Miyagawa [miyagawa.so.36u at kyoto-u.jp] (assistant prof. at Kyoto University).